Museum of Water is an invitation to ponder our precious liquid and how we use it.

Water is our most basic need but also our most overlooked, throwaway substance. We claim kinship with every water metaphor, yet in our actions we defend against it, squeezing and pumping, chlorinating and piping, soothed by our certainty that it will pour from our taps at a twist of our fingers.

It is time to re-examine our connection with the water that surrounds us, to develop a new relationship: to consider what is precious about it and how we are using it now in order to explore how we might save it for the future. We are all implicated in this.

Museum of Water has travelled to over 50 different sites worldwide, been visited by over 60,000 people, and currently holds over 1,000 bottles in the collection. In celebration of our access to fresh water, always running alongside the Museum is our Water Bar, a free pop-up outdoor bar serving fresh water from the nearest source.

Begun in 2013, in a time of relative plenty in Britain, Museum of Water travels across the world gathering collections of water for future generations to consider. The collection holds ghost water and bad dream water, water from the last ice age, a melted snowman, Norwegian spit, three types of urine, two different breaths, water from Lourdes, Mecca and the Ganges, Mediterranean sea from a refugee camp on Lesvos, water from an aboriginal grandmother remembering the stolen generation and the disappearing wetlands of Western Australia.

Explore our Collection online, listen to donors’ speaking about their water, keep an eye out for future events and bring your own water.

Choose what water is precious to you.
Help us build a collection of water for future generations to enjoy.
What water will you keep?


“We have always dedicated ourselves to work; we’ve never been known as protesters... we took off our farmer clothes and put on the uniform of guerrilla fighters”: Mexican farmers take over La ...Boquilla Dam #LaBoquilla #water #Climate #change

La Boquilla Dam, which was seized from the government by local farmers amid a water dispute with the United States, near Delicias, Chihuahua, Mexico.
‘This Is a War’: Cross-Border Fight Over Water Erupts in Mexico

Farmers in Mexico ambushed soldiers and seized a dam to stop water payments to the United States, in a sign of growing conflict over increasingly...

www.nytimes.com

On the BBC this morning there were politicians promoting the Australian policy of offshore immigration centres. They bemoaned the lack of ‘international waters’ between France and England, which ...had made Manus and Nauru detention centres possible.
Keir Starmer fiercely criticised the plan, telling reporters: "This isn't creative thinking... these suggestions are inhuman and the government shouldn't be pursuing them.”
Offshore does not mean outside ethics and morality. The darkness of the water doesn’t cloud principles of care and human rights.
#weareallconnected
#everyoneislegal
#manus #nauru

Image for shared link
Priti Patel looked at shipping UK asylum seekers to south Atlantic

Home Office officials were asked to explore building migrant centres on Ascension and St Helena

www.ft.com

For World Rivers Day please can we uplift incredible artists & thinkers around the world changing our understandings of rivers and water.
Today giving thanks for the transformative works of ...#AnnePoelina #emkaleyongakpa @lacaycedo

Dr Anne Poelina is a Nyikina Warrwa (Indigenous Australian) woman who belongs to the Mardoowarra, the lower Fitzroy River in the Kimberley region of Western Australia.
https://www.majala.com.au/anne-poelina
Her writings on transnational Environmental Law can be found online here -
https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6461-7681
RiverOfLife - M., Poelina, A., Bagnall, D., & Lim, M. (n.d.). Recognizing the Martuwarra’s First Law Right to Life as a Living Ancestral Being.

Em’kal Eyongakpa is an amazing artist from Cameroon who makes installations, sonic sculptures composed from recordings made in Eyongowa forests, streams, lakes, rivers and oceans in Southern Cameroons, vents and pipes from the artist’s studio, North Holland, Bondoukou in North-East Cote d’Ivoire and the Mediterranean, interwoven with poetry recitals, found sounds and stories on self-preservations, alternative
self-defence pointers.
https://emkaleyongakpa.blog

Carolina Caycedo is a London-born Colombian artist living in Los Angeles. She participates in movements of territorial resistance, solidarity economies, and housing as a human right. Her work contributes to the construction of environmental historical memory as a fundamental element for non-repetition of violence against human and non-human entities, and generates a debate about the future in relation to common goods, environmental justice, just energy transition and cultural biodiversity.
Please look at her fantastic work BE DAMMED
http://carolinacaycedo.com

#worldriversday #water #art #thanks #loveyourwork #interweavings #fragments #memory #future #now #environmentallaw #environmentaljustice #humanrights #riverrights #thecommons #sonic #resistance #ancestors #solidarity #borders #care #publiccommons #bedammed #museumofwater

It’s #WorldRiversDay please lets uplift incredible artists & thinkers changing our understandings of rivers & water. Today giving thanks for #AnnePoelina ...https://www.majala.com.au/anne-poelina #EmkalEyongakpa https://emkaleyongakpa.blog @carolinacaycedo http://carolinacaycedo.com
#loveyourwork #water

For World Rivers Day please can we uplift incredible artists and thinkers around the world changing our understandings of rivers and water. Today giving thanks and gratitude for the transformative ...works of Anne Poelina, Em'kal Eyongakpa and Carolina Caycedo.

Anne Poelina https://www.majala.com.au/anne-poelina
Her writings online here -
https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6461-7681
RiverOfLife, M., Poelina, A., Bagnall, D., & Lim, M. (n.d.). Recognizing the Martuwarra’s First Law Right to Life as a Living Ancestral Being. Transnational Environmental Law -
Traditional custodians of the Martuwarra (Fitzroy River) derive their identity and existence from this globally significant river. The First Laws of the Martuwarra are shared by Martuwarra Nations through a common songline, which sets out community and individual rights and duties. First Law recognizes the River as the Rainbow Serpent: a living ancestral being from source to sea. On 3 November 2016, the Fitzroy River Declaration was concluded between Martuwarra Nations. This marked the first time in Australia when both First Law and the rights of nature were recognized explicitly in a negotiated instrument. This article argues for legal recognition within colonial state laws of the Martuwarra as a living ancestral being by close analogy with the case concerning the Whanganui River. We seek to advance the scope of native title water rights in Australia and contend that implementation of First Law is fundamental for the protection of the right to life of the Martuwarra.

Em'kal Eyongakpa - https://emkaleyongakpa.blog
mɔ́ ntai tabindɔ #4, barɨŋ báchɔ́kɔrɔk #3 @ VanAbbe Museum (position #5) - The sonic backdrop is composed from recordings made in Eyongowa forests, streams, lakes, rivers and oceans in Southern Cameroons, vents and pipes from the artist’s studio, North Holland, Bondoukou in North-East Cote d’Ivoire and the Mediterranean. These are woven with poetic recitals and found sounds from elsewhere and the ongoing conflict in Southern Cameroons, stories on self-preservations, alternative
self-defence pointers.

http://carolinacaycedo.com
BE DAMMED (ongoing Project)
In Indigenous cosmogonies of the Americas, all bodies of waters are connected. Rivers are the veins of the planet, their waters associate communities and ecosystems. Be Dammed investigates the effects that large dams have on natural and social landscapes in several American bio-regions. More than 250 large hydroelectric dams are projected or under construction by transnational corporations in Latin America, signifying the transition of public bodies of water into privatized resources. At the same time, the U.S. is the leading country in dam removal, allowing for the restoration of river ecosystems. In Be Dammed, aerial and satellite imagery, geo-choreographies and audio-visual essays intersect social bodies with bodies of water, exploring public space in rural contexts, and conjuring water as a common good.
http://carolinacaycedo.com
Please watch her fantastic speech on Be Dammed -https://vimeo.com/142275532

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Carolina Caycedo Presents "Be Dammed" at the 2015 Creative Capital Retreat

In Indigenous cosmogonies of the Americas, all bodies of waters are connected. Rivers are the veins of the planet, their waters associate communities...

vimeo.com

It feels important to reiterate excerpts from Is racism an environmental threat? the brilliant book by Ghassan Hage - most especially now that the UK has hired a Clandestine Channel Threat Commander,... and in this week when the body of a teenage refugee washes up on a beach in France while 45 adults and children die in Libyan waters:

‘As the colonially traced borders begin to crumble under the weight of internally and externally produced crisis, asylum seekers... are like slaves attempting to free themselves from the increasingly suffocating national order of things’.
This in stark contrast to
‘The borderless world of smooth global sailing that remains the reserve of the cultural and economic upper classes.’

We need to keep focus on the racism and inequality and to guard against the routinisation of these spectacles.

A couple of posts on language, racism and the environment -

Who knew we had a Clandestine Channel Threat Commander? The militarisation of language urges towards fascism. On a day when the ...body of a teenage refugee washes up on a beach in France and 45 adults and children die in Libyan waters, if feels important to remember the counter discourse, routed in compassion.

Pascale Moreau, UNHCR Director for Europe:
“Our collective response should be comprehensive and complementary - from saving lives to combating smuggling rings, expanding legal options, and ensuring that all those who are in need of protection can effectively access it.”
https://www.unhcr.org/uk/news/press/2020/8/5f3567a84.html

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