Museum of Water is a collection of publicly donated water that tells stories of the people and places it comes from. It is an invitation to ponder our precious liquid and how we use it.

Water is our most basic need but also our most overlooked, throwaway substance. We claim kinship with every water metaphor, yet in our actions we defend against it, squeezing and pumping, chlorinating and piping, soothed by our certainty that it will pour from our taps at a twist of our fingers.

It is time to re-examine our connection with the water that surrounds us, to develop a new relationship: to consider what is precious about it and how we are using it now in order to explore how we might care for it in the future. We are all implicated in this.

Museum of Water has travelled to over 50 different sites worldwide, been visited by over 60,000 people, and currently holds over 1,000 bottles in the collection. In celebration of our access to fresh water, always running alongside the Museum is our Water Bar, a free pop-up outdoor bar serving fresh water from the nearest source.

Begun in 2013, in a time of relative plenty in Britain, Museum of Water travels across the world gathering collections of water for future generations to consider. The collection holds ghost water and bad dream water, water from the last ice age, a melted snowman as well as Norwegian spit, three types of urine and two different breaths. It holds water from Lourdes, Mecca and the Ganges, Mediterranean sea beside a refugee camp on Lesvos and water from an aboriginal grandmother remembering the stolen generation and the disappearing wetlands of Western Australia.

Explore our Collection online, listen to donors’ speaking about their water, keep an eye out for future events and bring your own water.

Choose what water is precious to you.
Help us build a collection of water for future generations to enjoy.
What water will you keep?


Posted @withregram • @wearenorth99 Videos are courtesy of @theslapppps

Some of these communities have had a whole generation living without clean drinking water.

Southern Water in the U.K. has been fined a record £90m for dumping sewage into sea.

The company pleaded guilty to 6,971 unlawful sewage discharges between 2010 and 2015, found to be ...caused by ‘deliberate failings’ and polluting rivers in Kent, Hampshire and Sussex.

The court was told Southern Water “deliberately presented a misleading picture of compliance” to the Environment Agency, hindering proper regulation of the company.

Mr Justice Jeremy Johnson, sentencing the privatised water company, said it had discharged between 16bn and 21bn litres of raw sewage into some of the most precious, delicate environments in the country. “These offences show a shocking and wholesale disregard for the environment, for precious and delicate ecosystems and coastlines, for human health, and for fisheries and other legitimate businesses that operate in the coastal waters,” said the judge.

Southern Water said it is “deeply sorry” for the historic incidents that led to the sentencing and fine.

#21bnlitres
#6971discharges
#southernwater
#guilty
#offence
#recordfine
#rawsewage
#dumping
#pleadingguilty #unlawfulsewage #deliberatefailings
#deliberatelymisleading
#shockingandwholesale
#disregardfortheenvironment
#pollutingrivers
#pollution
#water #environment
#waterlaw
#humanhealth
#humanandnonhuman
#mostprecious
#mostdelicate
#deeplysorry

Some recent legal successes
#peoplecare #watercare
#water #law #waterlaw #flood
#alwayswas #alwayswillbe

Posted @withregram • @decolonizemyself 1. Thunder Bay Supreme Court ...sides with Lac Seul First Nation over flooding compensation Canada's top court set aside $30M award, sent matter back to Federal Court
The Canadian Press.

2. Construction of the Ear Falls hydroelectric dam in the late 1920s flooded nearly 20 per cent of Lac Seul's reserve land without the First Nation's consent or compensation. (Ontario Power
Generation) The Lac Seul First Nation of northern Ontario has won a key round in its long fight to be properly compensated for the flooding of its lands caused by construction of a dam.

3. A hydroelectric dam to supply power to Winnipeg was built in 1929 under an agreement between Canada, Ontario and Manitoba. Lac Seul First Nation is located on the south shore of Lac Seul, about 290 kilometres northwest of Thunder Bay.

4. The project involved raising the water level of Lac Seul by about three metres to create a reservoir. It proceeded despite warnings about damage the flooding would cause to the Lac Seul First Nation reserve, and without lawful authorization or the consent of those affected. Almost one-fifth of the best land on the reserve was permanently flooded, destroying homes and wild rice fields and submerging gravesites.

Delighted to be part of the panel for The Global Network of Water Museums once again to choose this year’s winners for The Water We Want youth competition 2021. More than 20 water museums ...affiliated with the network participated, submitting beautiful drawings, videos, photos, slogans and soundscapes by children from across the world.

All the entries shortlisted are included in their online digital exhibition, follow their official social media to find out more and share the messages of these young water ambassadors #thewaterwewant2021

Congratulations are also due to the Global Network of Water Museums who are now supported by a second resolution at the Intergovernmental Council of the International Hydrological Programme of UNESCO.

The resolution from @IHPUNESCO recognises "that water museums worldwide are unique repositories of different water civilizations and of humanity’s multifaceted water heritage, both tangible and intangible, as well as important promoters for water awareness education and science, linking ancient knowledge to contemporary agendas that can help develop sustainable solutions to the global water crisis, and thereby also contribute to sustainable management models that support the emergence of a ‘new water culture’".

#MuseumofWater is a glad member of this warm-hearted community of water museums.

#intangiblewaterheritage #tangibleandintangible #ancientknowledge #contemporaryagendas #sustainablesolutions #globalwaterrisis #newwaterculture #theglobalnetworkofwatermuseums #winnersannounced #thewaterwewant2021 #water #exhibition #waterambassadors #wamunet

Delighted to be part of the panel for The Global Network of Water Museums once again to choose this year’s winners for The Water We Want youth competition 2021. More than 20 water museums ...affiliated with the network participated, submitting beautiful drawings, videos, photos, slogans and soundscapes by children from across the world.

All the entries shortlisted are included in their online digital exhibition, follow their official social media to find out more and share the messages of these young water ambassadors #thewaterwewant2021

Congratulations are also due to the Global Network of Water Museums who are now supported by a second resolution at the Intergovernmental Council of the International Hydrological Programme of UNESCO.

The resolution from @IHPUNESCO recognises "that water museums worldwide are unique repositories of different water civilizations and of humanity’s multifaceted water heritage, both tangible and intangible, as well as important promoters for water awareness education and science, linking ancient knowledge to contemporary agendas that can help develop sustainable solutions to the global water crisis, and thereby also contribute to sustainable management models that support the emergence of a ‘new water culture’".

#MuseumofWater is a glad member of this warm-hearted community.

#intangiblewaterheritage #tangibleandintangible #ancientknowledge #contemporaryagendas #sustainablesolutions #globalwaterrisis #newwaterculture #theglobalnetworkofwatermuseums #winnersannounced #thewaterwewant2021 #water #exhibition #waterambassadors #wamunet

Water in the Monument to Enslaved Laborers in the grounds of @uva - in a film sent by the always brilliant & inspirational @noel.lobley

The monument ‘honors the lives, labor, and ...resistance of the 4-5,000 enslaved people who lived and worked at UVA at some point between 1817 and 1865’. Do look online at the work UVA are doing to confront, understand and learn.
J Meejin Yoon from designers @howeleryoonarchitecture says of the 4,000 memory marks: “The memorial invites exploration. You can reach out and touch every mark.”

Posting today on Fathers’ Day in the UK, thinking of all kinds of fathers, loving & adoring fathers as well as absent & flawed fathers, lost fathers, current fathers, non-biological fathers, beloved fathers, mean fathers and founding fathers - all founding something in the generations that follow, seeding, raising, the good with the bad.
What kind of father do you want to be?

#fathersday #water #monuments #whatkindoffather #declarations #interdependence #memorymarks #exploration #touch #flow

Super excited to announce the launch of FEEDING BLACK @museumoflondon. The exhibition explores the relationship between community, power and place through spotlighting Black owned food enterprises in... South East London

On #worldoceansday sharing these incredible passages from M Archive, DUB Finding Ceremony and Undrowned, all books by the magnificent #alexispaulinegumbs @alexispauline

M is for ...Multitude
M is for Memory
M is for Magic
M is for More

With many thanks to Jade Montserrat for the introduction to her work.

#ocean #water
#museumofwater
#slowreading
#depthofmourning
#braveryofflow #remember #sheweptandwept #dreamsofbeing #ghostofocean #pulledbythemoon #whathecoralsaid #letthebodyundulate #Areyoulearningtoswim

We have had the opportunity to work with incredible photographers across the world, some over years. We are thankful for the brilliance of Ruth Corney, Ben Blossom, Lucy Carruthers, Pete Tweedie (UK), Salih Kilic (NL), Jess Wyld, Jacqueline Jane (WA), whose work features across this site. How to have a 3 minute shower by the brilliant Jen Jamieson and The Oceanic Sessions were part of Museum of Water WA.

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